Deutsch   English   Italiano   Nederlands
  Home  |  ContactCitymapEventsLivepictureFilmEmergencyImprint
  Home 
  Home 
Search
font size  A   A  A

History

KAMBODUNON (GREEK) – CAMBODUNUM (LATIN) – KEMPTEN.

CELTIC ORIGIN.

MEANING: FORTRESS OR SETTLEMENT AT THE RIVER BEND.

As a formerly Celtic and Roman Town, Kempten looks back on 2,000 years of history.
Having been mentioned by the Greek geographer Strabon, Kempten has the oldest written evidence of any German city.

The City had been separated for more than 600 years. The hostile coexistence of the Free Imperial City and the Convent City ruled by the Duke Abbot was only terminated by order of the King of Bavaria in 1818.

around 18/23 A.D.
First mentioning of Cambodunum by the Greek geographer Strabon. Cambodunum is one of the most important towns in the Roman province Raetia and, at times, was probably even the provincial capital.

in the 3rd century A.D.
Movement of the settlement, now called Cambidano, from the high plain to the foot of the "Burghalde" hill in the river valley.

around 740
Foundation of a missionary cell and a St. Mary’s church by the monks Magnus and Theodore from St. Gall (now Switzerland)

around 752
Audogar is mentioned as the first abbot of the Benedictine monastery Kempten, which at that time is strongly supported by the Carolingian rulers.

since the 12th century
The abbots of Kempten are members of the Dukes of the German Empire and bear the Dukes’ title.

1289
A privilege by King Rudolf of Habsburg granted to the settlement in the river valley marks the beginning of its development to an Imperial City.

1379
The Duke Abbot sells the Burghalde-fortress, the seat of the overseer of the monastery, which had been assaulted by the citizens in 1363, to the Imperial City.

1525
In the so-called "Great Purchase" the Imperial City acquires the last property rights from the Duke Abbot and is from now on entitled to call itself a "Free Imperial City".

1527
The Imperial City joins the Reformation by putting into service a protestant vicar.

1632/33
The Duke Abbey and the Imperial City destroy each other in the 30-years’-war with help of the imperial forces and the Swedish troops respectively.

1651/62
Reconstruction of the Abbots’ Residence and St. Lorenz Basilica starts, the first major church building project after the Thirty Years’ War.

1728
Duke Abbot Rupert von Bodman receives city privilege for the Duke Abbey; now there are two cities named "Kempten" in co-existence next to each other’s.

1738
The Duke Abbey Kempten is the first German state to introduce land and mortgage registers for farm estates, the so-called "Landtafeln" (land charts).

1802/03
Duke Abbey and Imperial City come under Bavarian rule and are subsequently united into a common entity in 1818.

1898
The world’s first industrial Diesel engine is put into service at the Kempten manufacture for matches.

1949
The Allgäuer Festwoche (Allgäu Festival Week) is introduced.

1972
Substantial gain of territory by incorporation of the edge-of-town communities Sankt Mang and Sankt Lorenz.

1978
The University of Applied Sciences Fachhochschule Kempten is founded, making Kempten a university city.

1987 to 2003
All three sections of the Archaeological Park Cambodunum – APC – are finished.

1999
The re-designed Allgäu-Museum in the Kornhaus, the former warehouse for crops, is inaugurated.

2003
Opening of the theme spa "CamboMare".

2004
Two new business parks with a total area of 39.5 acres are developed, namely Stiftsbleiche and Bühl-East. In the latter, a new building complex for the Kempten-based research centre for dairy products (muva) is erected.

2007
Germany’s largest diabetes and apheresis centre (MVZ) is inaugurated in the Medical Care Centre opposite the Hospital on Robert-Weixler-Street.

After completion of its refurbishment, the town’s theatre is re-opened with a ceremonial act.

Renovation of Saint-Mang Church is also completed, it is inaugurated with a festival service and a night of the Church with music and entertainment.

2008
Kempten University of Applied Sciences celebrates its 30th anniversary with a ceremonial act and an open house day.

2010
The "Stumbling Blocks"-initiative commemorates the 21 victims of the Nazi regime in Kempten.

The re-designed St.-Mang Square is inagurated and the exhibition room for the Erasmus Chapel is opened.

The "Mühlbachquartier", or "Millstream Quarter" has been adopted as the new name for the shopping area around "Gerberstraße" and "In der Brandstatt"-streets in the northern part of Kempten’s city centre.


 




Top